© Making Worlds

CRITICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

Worlds

Ayesha Ramachandran, “Introduction: Worldmaking and the Project of Modernity,” in The Worldmakers: Global Imagining in Early Modern Europe (Chicago, 2015), 1-18.

Allison Kavey, “Think you there was, or ever could be a world such as this I dreamed,” in A. Kavey, ed. World-building and the Early Modern Imagination (New York: 2010), 1-4.

Roland Greene, “World,” in Five Words: Critical Semantics in the age of Cervantes and Shakespeare (Chicago, 2013), 143-72.

Serge Gruzinski, “Art History and Iberian Worldwide Diffusion: Westernization/Globalization/Americanization,” in Circulations in the Global History of Art, ed. Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann, Catherine Dossin, and Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel (Ashgate, 2015), 47–58.

Alessandra Russo, “An artistic humanity. New positions on art and freedom in the context of Iberian expansion, 1500-1600,” Res. Anthropology and Aesthetics, 65-66 (2014-2015), 352-363.

Li, V., “Elliptical Interruptions: Or, Why Derrida Prefers Mondialisation to Globalization”, The New Centennial Review 7, 2 (Fall 2007), 141–154.

 

The Global Turn

 

Claire Farago, “The “Global Turn” in Art History: Why, When, and How Does It Matter?” In The Globalization of Renaissance Art, ed. Daniel Savoy (Leiden: Brill, 2017), 299-313.

Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann, Catherine Dossin, and Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel, ‘Reintroducing Circulations: Historiography and the Project of Global Art History’, in Circulations in the Global History of Art, ed. Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann, Catherine Dossin, and Béatrice Joyeux-Prunel (Ashgate, 2015), 1–22.

Aruna D’Souza, introduction to Art History in the Wake of the Global Turn, ed. Jill H. Casid and Aruna D’Souza (Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, 2014), vii–xxiii.

Peter Burke, Luke Clossey, and Felipe Fernández-Armesto, “The Global Renaissance,” Journal of World History, Vol.28: 1 (2017), 1-30.

Deborah Marrow & Joan Weinstein, “Introduction: Connecting Art Histories,” Art in Translation, 9:1 (2017), 3-6.

On the Getty “Connecting Art Histories” initiative:

http://www.getty.edu/foundation/initiatives/current/cah/index.html

Hannah Baader, Avinoam Shalem and Gerhard Wolf, “Art, Space, Mobility in Early Ages of Globalization: A Project, Multiple Dialogue, and Research Program,” Art in Translation, 9:1 (2017), 7-33.

 

“Roundtable on Globalisation,” October 133 (Summer 2010): 3–19.

 

“Netherlandish Art in its Global Context,” Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek. Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art, 66, 2016, ed. Thijs Weststeijn, Eric Jorink, Frits Scholten.

 

Cosmopolitanisms?

 

Ayesha Ramachandran, “Epilogue. From Cosmography to Cosmopolitanism,” in The Worldmakers: Global Imagining in Early Modern Europe (Chicago, 2015), 222-28.

 

Margaret C. Jacob, Strangers Nowhere in the World: The Rise of Cosmopolitanism in Early Modern Europe (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), 1-12.

 

E. Natalie Rothman, Brokering Empire: Trans-Imperial Subjects between Venice and Istanbul. (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011), 1-24.

 

Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (New York: W. W. Norton, 2007), xi-xxi.

Stuart Hall, “Political belonging in a world of multiple identities,” in Conceiving Cosmopolitanism ed. Steven Vertovec and Robin Cohen (Oxford, 2002).

Tomasz Grusiecki, “Critical Terms: Early Modern Cosmopolitanism?” (2016) https://www.makingworlds.net/cosmopolitanism

 

Brown, Garrett Wallace, and David Held. The Cosmopolitanism Reader (Cambridge, UK: Polity, 2010). (with excerpts from Kant).

 

Mobility

 

Astrid Erll, “Circulating Art and Material Culture. A Model of Transcultural Mediation,” in Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann and Michael North, eds., Mediating Netherlandish Art and Material Culture in Asia (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2014), 312-28.

 

Mia Mochizuki, “Connected Worlds,” The Nomadic Object: The Challenge of World for Early Modern Religious Art, eds. Göttler and Mochizuki (Leiden, 2017), 1-34. 

 

Avinoam Shalem, ‘Histories of belonging and George Kubler’s prime object’, Getty Research Journal, 3 (2011), 1–14.

 

Paula Findlen, ‘Introduction: Objects in motion, 1500–1800’, in P. Findlen, ed., Early Modern Things: Objects and their Histories, 1500–1800 (New York, 2013), 3–27

 

Stephen Greenblatt, “Cultural mobility: An introduction,” and “A mobility studies manifesto,” in Cultural Mobility: A Manifesto (Cambridge, 2010), 1-23, 250-253.

Tim Cresswell, ‘The production of mobilities: An interpretive framework’, in On the Move: Mobility in the Modern Western World, (New York, 2006), 1–25 (e-book)

 

Entanglement

 

Nicholas Thomas, Entangled Objects: Exchange, Material Culture, and Colonialism in the Pacific. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1991.

 

Hodder, Ian, “Chapter One,” Entangled: An Archaeology of the Relationships between Humans and Things. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, pp. 1-14.

 

Ralph Bauer & Marcy Norton, “Introduction: entangled trajectories: Indigenous and European histories,” Colonial Latin American Review, 26:1 (2017), 1-17.

 

Carolyn Dean & Dana Leibsohn, “Hybridity and Its Discontents: Considering Visual Culture in Colonial Spanish America,” Colonial Latin American Review, 12:1 (2003), 5-35.

 

Dana Leibsohn, “Introduction. Geographies of Sight,” in Seeing across Cultures in the early modern world (Routledge, 2012), 1-20.

Kumkum Chatterjee and Clement Hawes. Europe Observed: Multiple Gazes in Early Modern Encounters (Bucknell University Press, 2008).

 

Materials

 

Tim Ingold, “Materials against materiality,” Archaeological Dialogues, 14:1 (2007), 1-16.

 

“Introduction,” in The Matter of Art: Materials, Practices, Cultural Logistics, c. 1250–1750, ed. Christy Anderson, Anne Dunlop, and Pamela H. Smith (Manchester, 2015), 1-17.

 

Lehmann, Ann-Sophie. “The Matter as the Medium: Some Tools for an Art-theoretical Interpretation of Materials.” In The Matter of Art: Materials, Practices, Cultural Logistics, c. 1250–1750, edited by Christy Anderson, Anne Dunlop, and Pamela H. Smith (Manchester, 2015), 21-41.

 

Dana Leibsohn and Meha Priyadarshini, “Transpacific: beyond silk and silver,” Colonial Latin American Review, 25:1 (2016), 1-15.

 

Materials: Case Studies

 

Hamann, Byron Ellsworth. “The Mirrors of Las Meninas: Cochineal, Silver, and Clay.” The Art Bulletin, vol. 92, no. 1/2, 2010, pp. 6-35.

Lauren Jacobi, “Reconsidering the World-system: The Agency and Material Geography of Gold,” The Globalization of Renaissance Art, ed. Daniel Savoy (2017), 131-57.

 

Anne Dunlop, “On the origins of European Painting Materials, Real and Imagined.” In The Matter of Art: Materials, Practices, Cultural Logistics, c. 1250–1750, edited by Christy Anderson, Anne Dunlop, and Pamela H. Smith (Manchester, 2015) 68-96.

 

Carolyn Dean, “Rocks and reverence: Inka and Spanish perceptions of stonework in the early modern Andes,” in The Matter of Art, pp. 180-201.

Christine Göttler, “Extraordinary Things: ‘Idols from India’ and the Visual Discernment of Space and Time, circa 1600,” in The Nomadic Object: The Challenge of World for Early Modern Religious Art, eds. Göttler and Mochizuki (Leiden, 2017), 37-73.

 

Diana Fane, “Feathers, Jade, Turquoise, and Gold,” in Images Take Flight: Feather Art in Mexico and Europe (1400-1700). Ed. Alessandra Russo, Gerhard Wolf, and Diana Fane (Munich, 2015), 100-117.

 

Anne Gerritsen & Giorgio Riello, eds., The Global Lives of Things: The Material Culture of Connections in the Early Modern World (London: 2016).

 

Yukio Lippit, “Japan's Southern Barbarian Screens.” In Encompassing the Globe: Portugal and the World in 16th and 17th Centuries (Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institute, 2007).

 

Finlay, Robert. The Pilgrim Art: Cultures of Porcelain in World History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010), 1-15.

Teresa Canepa, Silk, Porcelain and Lacquer. China and Japan and the trade with Western Europe and the New World, 1500-1644 (London, 2016).